Is America About Freedom and Rights, How Police, Judges, Government and Lawyers Abuse our Courts

Is America About Freedom and Rights, How Police, Judges, Government and Lawyers Abuse our Courts

Is America About Freedom and Rights, How Police, Judges, Government and Lawyers Abuse our Courts. 96 Days in Jail on Bogus Charges, It’s no one’s fault?

Poll: Young Americans have “little confidence” in justice system

Pulled over for traffic violations, Jessica Jauch was held for 96 days in a Mississippi jail without seeing a judge, getting a lawyer or having a chance to make bail. She was charged with a felony based on a secretly recorded video that prosecutors finally acknowledged showed her committing no crime.

Only when she finally got a hearing and a lawyer, who persuaded prosecutors to watch the video, did the case fall apart.

Then, the 34-year-old mother sued, alleging violations of her rights to bail, legal representation, a speedy trial and liberty.

But a federal judge dismissed her case against Choctaw County and Sheriff Cloyd Halford last month, ruling that because she had been indicted by a grand jury on the felony drug charge, none of her constitutional and legal rights were violated.

The outcome has flummoxed civil liberties advocates who have been waging legal battles to reform Mississippi’s criminal justice system, which provides almost no state funding for public defenders.

“I can’t think of a situation where denying someone an appearance before a judge for 96 days after arrest passes constitutional muster,” said attorney Cliff Johnson, who has sued Mississippi localities over pretrial detention and high bails for indigent defendants.

Similar lawsuits have been filed across the country. The American Civil Liberties Union is working state by state to force increased funding for public defenders, particularly in places where court-appointed lawyers depend on stingy local governments and court fees to get paid. Read FULL STORY

More Info
Jailed 96 days on bogus charge: It is no one’s fault?
Pulled over for traffic violations, Jessica Jauch was held for 96 days in a Mississippi jail without seeing a judge
Only when she finally got a hearing and a lawyer, who persuaded prosecutors to watch the video, did the case fall apart
Without seeing a judge, getting a lawyer or having a chance to make bail, even though a police video showed she committed no crime.
“I can’t think of a situation where denying someone an appearance before a judge for 96 days after arrest passes constitutional muster,”

This is not an isolated case, in fact this is common. Courts are suppose to be about justice just as police are suppose to serve and protect. However as video technology has exposed the lies and deceit by police the fact that our courts are used against us is being exposed. Most people think going to court means getting a fair hearing by a non-biased judge.

Think again, millions of people are victimized by an unfair, highly biased system based on greed and profit not the lies of justice and equality we expect. The constitution means nothing in our courts, nor do laws when  you go up against big money or the system. There are in fact two classes, one which must obey and the other which is above the law.

Lets take Cary-Andrew Crittenden who has spent months in jail for a crime he did not commit. While exposing a dishonest judge Socrates Peter Manoukian Crittenden found out just how dishonest police and our courts can be.

INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALIST JANET C PHELAN ABOUT ACTIVIST CARY ANDREW CRITTENDEN INCARCERATED IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY CA
Santa Clara County California Government Conspiracy Exposed Police Falsified Reports To Frame Whistle Blower Cary Andrew Crittenden
Police LIE To Stop Cary Andrew Crittenden From Exposing A Corrupt Judge In Santa Clara County California
Malicious Prosecution by Assistant Santa Clara County District Attorney James Leonard
Crimes Of David Angel Assistant District Attorney





entire santa clara county lies tot hide corruption and dishonest legal system to frame innocent cary andrew crittenden

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